An Invitation to Join Mentalhealthbooks.net Email List

Mental Health Email list

Hi! My name is William Jiang, MLS, and I have been a member of Fountain House since 2011. I joined Fountain House after my seven year tenure as a medical Library Chief at Columbia University/NYSPI under Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman. I did not want to be isolated in upper Manhattan. Fountain House helped with my socialization and learning conversational French. Oui! Maintenant, je parle francais! Tres bien! Merci Fountain House!

I started www.Mentalhealthbooks.net   to continue my personal mission which started in 2000 with New York City Voices Newsapaper under luminary Dan Frey, and then later as the Patient Librarian at Columbia Psychiatry/NYSPI. If one types “books schizophrenia” in Google, Mentalhealthbooks.net page about the “Best books about Schizophrenia” is in the top 3 results, just after Amazon. Today, I wanted to let you know of an exciting new email list that I am curating which can be joined at

Why join? So far we have featured the best selling book by Dr. Lieberman, “Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry” as well as two of my popular books A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of Hope and Guide to Natural Mental Health. You can see the archives of the email list at the link above. So far we have added 500 mental-health friendly bookstores across the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. Also, I’ve opened up membership to my social media platforms on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Now, I am excited for the opportunity to let Fountain House and the Clubhouse community know about the mailing list about great reads in Mental Health and Advocacy. Anybody with an interest in quality mental health books is welcome to join the list, as well as to let their family and friends know that there are good books out there to inspire and inform about mental health.

Book Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars- Good mental hygiene improves your life By Whistlers Mom Amazon TOP 500 REVIEWER

August 19, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition

When I was young, many people rejected the importance of dental hygiene. They Guide to Natural Mental Health Reviewpreferred to believe that they developed cavities because they had “soft teeth.” That a woman would lose a tooth for every baby she gave birth to. That if their grandparents finished up toothless, they were doomed to the same fate. It was all bad luck and genetics and brushing, flossing, good diet, and not using tobacco would make no difference.

Today, most people understand the importance of good dental hygiene, but we’re still in the Dark Ages when it comes to committing to good mental hygiene. Mental illness is scary and embarrassing and seems to strike like a bolt of thunder. In a laudable attempt to reduce the stigma of mental illness, experts stress that it may be hereditary or a result of chemical imbalances. Either way, it’s out of our control, right?

This author is a medical librarian and himself a survivor of mental illness. On both scores, he understands the importance of being well-informed. He has read thousands of articles in medical journals most of them describing the findings of clinical research in the areas of depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and internet addictions. He introduces these papers and gives a brief summing up of their critical points, with special emphasis on findings which relate to self-help measures. AND he tells you the web sites where you can read the entire article yourself.

I approached this book with great misgivings. I grew up at a time when doctors were still struggling to convince the general public that they were offering something worth paying for. They did it by promoting the idea that health is only understandable by those who have gone to medical school and that traditional practices and wisdom were “old wives tales” – silly and probably dangerous. Many (most, really) books about “alternative medicine” are poorly researched and have a strong mercenary bias. “Massive doses of dandelion tea cured my cancer and I sell the only dandelion tea mix that works.” You know the sort of thing.

This author isn’t going to get rich selling his book and I don’t believe that he wrote it with that intent. He does believe passionately that we can help ourselves to better mental health by practicing good mental hygiene – diet, exercise, prayer, and developing strong personal relationships. Modern medicine is beginning to adopt the same idea and these articles represent studies and tests from well-known and well-respected medical centers, universities, and organizations. This is not snake oil, but knowledge gleaned from scientific research.

So why doesn’t everyone know about it? Because a pharmaceutical company can spend billions of dollars yearly telling the public about the benefits of its products, but there’s no profit in telling you that turning your computer off and talking to a friend or taking a walk (or better yet, both at once!) will make you feel better.

When it comes to the workings of the mind, we are only beginning to explore a new frontier. In the future, our present “knowledge” will be laughable. But we can use the latest ideas and combine them with traditional wisdom to help ourselves. You are your own best doctor and (whether it’s physical or mental illness) the best out-comes result when the patient and those who love him are well-informed and taking an active role in the process.

***** Mr. Jiang very kindly gave me a copy of his book, but that didn’t influence my opinions one bit! I skimmed it and now I’m re-reading the sections that are of special interest to me. It’s a book that should be in every household that has been affected by mental illness. That’s all of us, right?

Best Books about Mental Health: History

Best Mental Health Books: History

Best Mental Health Books as Curated by Former Columbia Psychiatry/ NYSPI Library Chief William Jiang, MLSBest Books About Mental Health: History

Best Mental Health Books: History as Curated by former Columbia Psychiatry Library Chief

Bienvenidos! My name is William Jiang, MLS and I was the Chief of the Patient Library at Columbia Psychiatry / New York State Psychiatric Institute for almost a decade from 2004-2011. The following are the “best” books about mental health and history at the Columbia Psychiatry Patient Library during my tenure and beyond.

Best Mental Health Books: History

  • A Historical Reader: The New York Times and Madness, 1851-1922
    by William Jiang, MLS “The entire raison d’être for this mental health historical reader of the “paper of record”, The New York Times, is to give the reader a window on the past and to include the reader on a journey of a time long ago. What people come away with when, they see the original articles written by and about Sigmund Freud or his famous “psychanalysis” as well as the many other issues we see in these pages, transports us to another time and place. This work of non-fiction contains lessons for our world of today.”
  • Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry
    by Jeffrey A. Lieberman and Ogi Ogas “Psychiatry has come a long way since the days of chaining “lunatics” in cold cells. But, as Jeffrey Lieberman, MD, reveals in his eye-opening book, the path to legitimacy for “the black sheep of medicine” has been anything but smooth. Dr. Lieberman traces the field from its birth as a mystic pseudo-science to its late blooming maturity–beginning after World War II–as a science-driven profession that saves lives. With fascinating case studies and portraits of the field’s luminaries–from Sigmund Freud to Eric Kandel–SHRINKS is a gripping read, and an urgent call-to-arms to dispel the stigma of mental illnesses by treating them as diseases rather than unfortunate states of mind.”
  • Fountain House: Portraits of Lives Reclaimed from Mental Illness
    by Mark Glickman and Mary Flannery “Severe mental illness affects 5.5 million people in the U.S. usually striking between the ages of 15 and 24. Family members are often overwhelmed as they try to cope with their love one’s illness and treatment.  Fountain House has helped tens of thousands of people since its inception in 1948 in New York City. Their highly successful treatment Best Books about Mental Health: Historyprogram, which combines a psycho-social approach to rehabilitation, has generated a network of 250 other similar groups around the world.  In Fountain House: Portraits of Lives Reclaimed, twelve Fountain House members and staffers share their personal stories of struggling with the pain and confusion of their illness. Each of these stories highlights the personal challenges faced by people with severe mental illness as well as the successful models they’ve discovered for living with their illness.”
  • Lincoln’s Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness
    by Joshua Wolf Shenk “Drawing on seven years of his own research and the work of other esteemed Lincoln scholars, Shenk reveals how the sixteenth president harnessed his depression to fuel his astonishing success. Lincoln found the solace and tactics he needed to deal with the nation’s worst crisis in the “coping strategies” he had developed over a lifetime of persevering through depressive episodes and personal tragedies. With empathy and authority gained from his own experience with depression, Shenk crafts a nuanced, revelatory account of Lincoln and his legacy. Based on careful, intrepid research, Lincoln’s Melancholy unveils a wholly new perspective on how our greatest president brought America through its greatest turmoil. Shenk relates Lincoln’s symptoms, including mood swings and at least two major breakdowns, and offers compelling evidence of the evolution of his disease, from “major depression” in his twenties and thirties to “chronic depression” later on. Shenk reveals the treatments Lincoln endured and his efforts to come to terms with his melancholy, including a poem he published on suicide and his unpublished writings on the value of personal—and national—suffering. By consciously shifting his goal away from personal contentment (which he realized he could not attain) and toward universal justice, Lincoln gained the strength and insight that he, and America, required to transcend profound darkness.”

I invite you to add your own favorite books about mental health history in the comments.

In Health,

William Jiang, MLS

Best Books about Depression

Best Books about Depression

Best Books about Depression as Curated by former Columbia Psychiatry Library Chief

Best Books about Depression
Former Columbia Psychiatry/ NYSPI Library Chief, William Jiang, MLS

Bienvenidos! My name is William Jiang, MLS and I was the Chief of the Patient Library at Columbia Psychiatry / New York State Psychiatric Institute for almost a decade from 2004-2011. According to the Surgeon General, more than one in four people in the United States struggles with mental health issues: anxiety, bipolar (manic-depression), depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and more. By 2020, the World Health Organization says that depression will be the number one cause of long term disability and death, worldwide.  The following are the best books about depression of the Columbia Psychiatry Patient Library during my tenure and of today.

Best Books about DepressionBest Books About Depression

  • The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression
    by Andrew Solomon “Sometimes, the legacy of depression includes a wisdom beyond one’s years, a depth of passion unexperienced by those who haven’t traveled to hell and back. Off the charts in its enlightening, comprehensive analysis of this pervasive yet misunderstood condition, The Noonday Demon forges a long, brambly path through the subject of depression– exposing all the discordant views and “answers” offered by science, philosophy, law, psychology, literature, art, and history. The result is a sprawling and thoroughly engrossing study, brilliantly synthesized by author Andrew Solomon.”
  • Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies
    by William Jiang, MLS “In this useful guide, Jiang gives a short practical summary of a wide variety of mental disorders ranging from the classical bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia to the more modern affliction of digital addictions. In each category, he supplies a list of non-pharmacologic treatments, providing for each item a reference with abstract. He also offers resources such as national networks and local support groups.” – Marjorie Ordene, MD
  • Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness
    by William Styron “In the summer of 1985, William Styron became numbed by disaffection, apathy, and despair, unable to speak or walk while caught in the grip of advanced depression. His struggle with the disease culminated in a wave of obsession that nearly drove him to suicide, leading him to seek hospitalization before the dark tide engulfed him.”
  • Against Depression
    by Peter D. Kramer “In his landmark bestseller Listening to Prozac, Peter Kramer revolutionized the way we think about antidepressants and the culture in which they are so widely used. Now Kramer offers a frank and unflinching look at the condition those medications treat: depression. Definitively refuting our notions of “heroic melancholy,” he walks readers through groundbreaking new research—studies that confirm depression’s status as a devastating disease and suggest pathways toward resilience. Thought-provoking and enlightening, Against Depression provides a bold revision of our understanding of mood disorder and promises hope to the millions who suffer from it.”
  • Down Came the Rain: My Journey Through Postpartum Depression
     by Brooke Shields  “In this compelling memoir, Brooke Shields talks candidly about her experience with postpartum depression after the birth of her daughter, and provides millions of women with an inspiring example of recovery. When Brooke Shields welcomed her newborn daughter, Rowan Francis, into the world, something unexpected followed–a crippling depression. Now, for the first time ever, in Down Came the Rain, Brooke talks about the trials, tribulations, and finally the triumphs that occurred before, during, and after the birth of her daughter.”
  • Shock
    by Kitty Dukakis “Kitty Dukakis has battled debilitating depression for more than twenty years. Coupled with drug and alcohol addictions that both hid and fueled her suffering, Kitty’s despair was overwhelming. She tried every medication and treatment available; none worked for long. It wasn’t until she tried electroconvulsive therapy, or ECT, that she could reclaim her life. Kitty’s dramatic first-person account of how ECT keeps her illness at bay is half the story of Shock. The other half, by award winning medical reporter Larry Tye, is an engrossing look at the science behind ECT and its dramatic yet subterranean comeback. This book presents a full picture of ECT, analyzing the treatment’s risks along with its benefits. ECT, it turns out, is neither a panacea nor a scourge but a serious option for treating life threatening and disabling mental diseases, like depression, bipolar disorder, and others.”
  • The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness (Book & CD)
    by Mark Williams  “If you’ve ever struggled with depression, take heart. Mindfulness, a simple yet powerful way of paying attention to your most difficult emotions and life experiences, can help you break the cycle of chronic unhappiness once and for all. In The Mindful Way through Depression, four uniquely qualified experts explain why our usual attempts to “think” our way out of a bad mood or just “snap out of it” lead us deeper into the downward spiral. Through insightful lessons drawn from both Eastern meditative traditions and cognitive therapy, they demonstrate how to sidestep the mental habits that lead to despair, including rumination and self-blame, so you can face life’s challenges with greater resilience. This enhanced e-book includes an audio program of guided meditations narrated by Jon Kabat-Zinn.”
  • 100 Questions & Answers About Depression
    by Ava T. Albrecht  “Empower Yourself! Approximately 35 to 40 million Americans will deal with depression at some point in their lives. 100 Questions & Answers About Depression, Second Edition provides practical, authoritative answers to key questions about depression. Written in an easy-to-understand style by two prominent psychiatrists, Drs. Ava T. Albrecht and Charles Herrick, this unique guide presents comprehensive information on causes of depression, treatment options, and coping techniques. This completely revised book includes essential new topics on risk factors associated with depression, brain therapies, physiological drug dependence, and more! The only book to feature both patient and doctor views, this invaluable resource has the tools you need to understand and deal with this debilitating condition.”
  • Lincoln’s Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness
    by Joshua Wolf Shenk “Drawing on seven years of his own research and the work of other esteemed Lincoln scholars, Shenk reveals how the sixteenth president harnessed his depression to fuel his astonishing success. Lincoln found the solace and tactics he needed to deal with the nation’s worst crisis in the “coping strategies” he had developed over a lifetime of persevering through depressive episodes and personal tragedies. With empathy and authority gained from his own experience with depression, Shenk crafts a nuanced, revelatory account of Lincoln and his legacy. Based on careful, intrepid research, Lincoln’s Melancholy unveils a wholly new perspective on how our greatest president brought America through its greatest turmoil. Shenk relates Lincoln’s symptoms, including mood swings and at least two major breakdowns, and offers compelling evidence of the evolution of his disease, from “major depression” in his twenties and thirties to “chronic depression” later on. Shenk reveals the treatments Lincoln endured and his efforts to come to terms with his melancholy, including a poem he published on suicide and his unpublished writings on the value of personal—and national—suffering. By consciously shifting his goal away from personal contentment (which he realized he could not attain) and toward universal justice, Lincoln gained the strength and insight that he, and America, required to transcend profound darkness.”
  • Mind Over Mood, Second Edition: Change How You Feel by Changing the Way You Think
    by Dennis Greenberger and Christine Padesky “Developed by two master clinicians with extensive experience in cognitive therapy treatment and training, this popular workbook shows readers how to improve their lives using cognitive therapy. The book is designed to be used alone or in conjunction with professional treatment. Step-by-step worksheets teach specific skills that have helped hundreds of thousands people conquer depression, panic attacks, anxiety, anger, guilt, shame, low self-esteem, eating disorders, substance abuse and relationship problems. Readers learn to use mood questionnaires to identify, rate, and track changes in feelings; change the thoughts that contribute to problems; follow step-by-step strategies to improve moods; and take action to improve daily living and relationships. The book’s large-size format facilitates reading and writing ease.”
  • His Bright Light: The Story of Nick Traina
    by Danielle Steel “I want to share the story, and the pain, the courage, the love, and what I learned in living through it. I want Nick’s life to be not only a tender memory for us, but a gift to others. . . . I would like to offer people hope and the realities we lived with. I want to make a difference. My hope is that someone will be able to use what we learned, and save a life with it.”—Danielle Steel From the day he was born, Nick Traina was his mother’s joy. By nineteen, he was dead. This is Danielle Steel’s powerful, personal story of the son she lost and the lessons she learned during his courageous battle against darkness. Sharing tender, painful memories and Nick’s remarkable journals, Steel brings us a haunting duet between a singular young man and the mother who loved him—and a harrowing portrait of a masked killer called manic depression, which afflicts between two and three million Americans. At once a loving legacy and an unsparing depiction of a devastating illness, Danielle Steel’s tribute to her lost son is a gift of life, hope, healing, and understanding to us all.”
  • Churchill and the ‘Black Dog’ of Depression: Reassessing the Biographical Evidence of Psychological Disorder
    by Wilfred Attenborough “Winston Churchill is widely believed to have been at risk from a congenital tendency towards prolonged, despairing, even suicidal, depression, from which he is said to have sought escape in ceaseless career-related endeavour. In this, the first book-length sifting of all the available biographical evidence, including extracts from archival letters and papers and never before been published materials, the truth emerges as significantly less grave than legend has it, but somewhat more complex. An essay Churchill published first in 1925 as a magazine article with the deceptively mundane title ‘Hobbies’ emerges as the key to understanding the cultural icon’s actual psychological difficulties, and his management of them. Attenborough’s pioneering book provides a clearer and deeper understanding of Churchill the man, and it substantially modifies the established interpretation of the influence of his inner world on Churchill the politician and statesman.”

 

I invite you to add your own favorite books about depression in the comments.

In Health,

William Jiang, MLS

 

Best Mental Health Books: Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, & More

Best Mental Health Books

Best Mental Health Books as Curated by former Columbia Psychiatry Library Chief

Bienvenidos! My name is William Jiang, MLS and I was

best mental health books
Former Columbia Psychiatry/ NYSPI Library Chief, William Jiang, MLS

the Chief of the Patient Library at Columbia Psychiatry / New York State Psychiatric Institute for almost a decade from 2004-2011. According to the Surgeon General, more than one in four people in the United States struggles with mental health issues: anxiety, bipolar (manic-depression), depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and more. The following are the best books about mental health that were most used and popular about bipolar disorder, depression, schizophrenia, and errata at the Columbia Psychiatry Patient Library during my tenure.

Best Mental Health Books about Depression

  • The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression by Andrew Solomon “Sometimes, the legacy of depression includes a wisdom beyond one’s years, a depth of passion unexperienced by those who haven’t traveled to hell and back. Off the charts in its enlightening, comprehensive analysis of this pervasive yet misunderstood condition, The Noonday Demon forges a long, brambly path through the subject of depression– exposing all the discordant views and “answers” offered by science, philosophy, law, psychology, literature, art, and history. The result is a sprawling and thoroughly engrossing study, brilliantly synthesized by author Andrew Solomon.”
  • Darkness Visible by William Styron “In the summer of 1985, William Styron became numbed by disaffection, apathy, and despair, unable to speak or walk while caught in the grip of advanced depression. His struggle with the disease culminated in a wave of obsession that nearly drove him to suicide, leading him to seek hospitalization before the dark tide engulfed him.”Best Books About Mental Health
  • Against Depression by Peter D. Kramer “In his landmark bestseller Listening to Prozac, Peter Kramer revolutionized the way we think about antidepressants and the culture in which they are so widely used. Now Kramer offers a frank and unflinching look at the condition those medications treat: depression. Definitively refuting our notions of “heroic melancholy,” he walks readers through groundbreaking new research—studies that confirm depression’s status as a devastating disease and suggest pathways toward resilience. Thought-provoking and enlightening, Against Depression provides a bold revision of our understanding of mood disorder and promises hope to the millions who suffer from it.”
  • Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies by William Jiang, MLS “In this useful guide, Jiang gives a short practical summary of a wide variety of mental disorders ranging from the classical bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia to the more modern affliction of digital addictions. In each category, he supplies a list of non-pharmacologic treatments, providing for each item a reference with abstract. He also offers resources such as national networks and local support groups.” – Marjorie Ordene, MD
  • Down Came the Rain: My Journey Through Postpartum Depression  by Brooke Shields  “In this compelling memoir, Brooke Shields talks candidly about her experience with postpartum depression after the birth of her daughter, and provides millions of women with an inspiring example of recovery. When Brooke Shields welcomed her newborn daughter, Rowan Francis, into the world, something unexpected followed–a crippling depression. Now, for the first time ever, in Down Came the Rain, Brooke talks about the trials, tribulations, and finally the triumphs that occurred before, during, and after the birth of her daughter.”

Best Mental Health Books about Bipolar

  • An Unquiet Mind by Kay Redfield Jamison “An international authority on manic-depressive illness, and one of the few women who are full professors of medicine at American Universities – a remarkable personal testimony: the revelation of her own struggle since adolescence with manic depression, and how it shaped her life. With vivid prose and wit, she takes us into the fascinating and dangerous territory of this form of madness – a world in which one pole can be the alluring dark land ruled by what Byron called the “melancholy Best Mental Health Booksstar of the imagination,” and the other a desert of depression and, all too frequently, death.”
  • 100 Questions & Answers about Bipolar Disorder by Ava T. Albrecht  “Whether you’re a newly diagnosed patient, a friend, or relative, this book offers help. The only volume to provide both the doctor’s and patient’s views, 100 Questions & Answers About Bipolar (Manic-Depressive) Disorder, gives you authoritative, practical answers to your questions about treatment options, coping strategies, sources of support, and much more. Written by a prominent psychiatrist, with actual patient commentary, this book is an invaluable resource for anyone coping with the medical, psychological, and emotional turmoil of this debilitating condition.”
  • Touched With Fire: Manic-depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament by Kay Redfield Jamison “Drawing from the lives of artists such as Van Gogh, Byron and Virginia Woolf, Jamison examines the links between manic-depression and creativity.”

Best Mental Health Books about Schizophrenia

  • A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar “In this powerful and dramatic biography Sylvia Nasar vividly re-creates the life of a mathematical genius whose career was cut short by schizophrenia and who, after three decades of devastating mental illness, miraculously recovered and was honored with a Nobel Prize. A Beautiful Mind traces the meteoric rise of John Forbes Nash, Jr., a prodigy and legend by the age of thirty, who dazzled the mathematical world by solving a series of deep problems deemed “impossible” by other mathematicians.”
  • A Schizophrenic Will: a Story of Madness, a Story of Hope by William Jiang, MLS “A talented ambitious young student is afflicted by the most dread mental illness in the prime of his life. Best books about Menal HealthThis first person account describes this all to common occurrence but what is unique is how he reacts to this adversity and his courageous and successful journey to recovery. Will Jiang’s impressive and moving story is reminiscent of other similar first person accounts of personal struggle and triumph over mental illness including Elyn Saks’ The Center Cannot Hold and Temple Grandin’s Thinking In Pictures: and Other Reports from My Life with Autism. Will’s story will be similarly informative and inspirational to everyone who has the good fortune to read it.” — Jeffrey Lieberman, M.D. President, American Psychiatric Association
  • The Center Cannot Hold by Elyn Saks “Elyn R. Saks is an esteemed professor, lawyer, and psychiatrist and is the Orrin B. Evans Professor of Law, Psychology, Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences at the University of Southern California Law School, yet she has suffered from schizophrenia for most of her life, and still has ongoing major episodes of the illness. THE CENTER CANNOT HOLD is the eloquent, moving story of Elyn’s life, from the first time that she heard voices speaking to her as a young teenager, to attempted suicides in college, through learning to live on her own as an adult in an often terrifying world. Saks discusses frankly the paranoia, the inability to tell imaginary fears from real ones, the voices in her head telling her to kill herself (and to harm others); as well the incredibly difficult obstacles she overcame to become a highly respected professional. This beautifully written memoir is destined to become a classic in its genre.”

Best Mental Health Books about Mental Health Issues

  • Mind Over Mood: Change How You Feel by Changing the Way You Think by Dennis Greenberger and Christine Padesky “Developed by two master clinicians with extensive experience in cognitive therapy treatment and training, this popular workbook shows readers how to improve their lives using cognitive therapy. The book is designed to be used alone or in conjunction with professional treatment. Step-by-step worksheets teach specific skills that have helped hundreds of thousands people conquer depression, panic attacks, anxiety, anger, guilt, shame, low self-esteem, eating disorders, substance abuse and relationship problems. Readers learn to use mood questionnaires to identify, rate, and track changes in feelings; change the thoughts that contribute to problems; follow step-by-step strategies to improve moods; and take action to improve daily living and relationships. The book’s large-size format facilitates reading and writing ease.”
  • I Am Not Sick, I Don’t Need Help! How to Help Someone with Mental Illness Accept Treatment. 10th Anniversary Edition by Xavier Amador “’This book fills a tremendous void…’ wrote E. Fuller Torrey, M.D., about the first edition of I AM NOT SICK, I Don’t Need Help! Ten years later, it still does. Dr. Amador’s research on poor insight was inspired by his attempts to help his brother Henry, who developed schizophrenia, accept treatment. Like tens of millions of others diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Henry did not believe he was ill. In this latest edition, 6 new chapters have been added, new research on anosognosia (lack of insight) is presented and new advice, relying on lessons learned from thousands of LEAP seminar participants, is given to help readers quickly and effectively use Dr. Amador s method for helping someone accept treatment. I AM NOT SICK, I Don’t Need Help! is not just a reference for mental health practitioners or law enforcement professionals. It is a must-read guide for family members whose loved ones are battling mental illness. Read and learn as have hundreds of thousands of others…to LEAP-Listen, Empathize, Agree, and Partner-and help your patients and loved ones accept the treatment they need.”
  • Lincoln’s Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness by Best Books about Mental HealthJoshua Wolf Shenk “Drawing on seven years of his own research and the work of other esteemed Lincoln scholars, Shenk reveals how the sixteenth president harnessed his depression to fuel his astonishing success. Lincoln found the solace and tactics he needed to deal with the nation’s worst crisis in the “coping strategies” he had developed over a lifetime of persevering through depressive episodes and personal tragedies. With empathy and authority gained from his own experience with depression, Shenk crafts a nuanced, revelatory account of Lincoln and his legacy. Based on careful, intrepid research, Lincoln’s Melancholy unveils a wholly new perspective on how our greatest president brought America through its greatest turmoil. Shenk relates Lincoln’s symptoms, including mood swings and at least two major breakdowns, and offers compelling evidence of the evolution of his disease, from “major depression” in his twenties and thirties to “chronic depression” later on. Shenk reveals the treatments Lincoln endured and his efforts to come to terms with his melancholy, including a poem he published on suicide and his unpublished writings on the value of personal—and national—suffering. By consciously shifting his goal away from personal contentment (which he realized he could not attain) and toward universal justice, Lincoln gained the strength and insight that he, and America, required to transcend profound darkness.”
  • The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain, from Vienna 1900 to the Present by Eric Kandel MD, PhD “A brilliant book by Nobel Prize winner Eric R. Kandel, The Age of Insight takes us to Vienna 1900, where leaders in science, medicine, and art began a revolution that changed forever how we think about the human mind—our conscious and unconscious thoughts and emotions—and how mind and brain relate to art.”

Best Mental Health Books: Recently Published

  • Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry by Jeffrey A. Lieberman “The fascinating story of psychiatry’s origins, demise, and redemption, by the former President of the American Psychiatric Association. Psychiatry has come a long way since the days of chaining “lunatics” in cold cells and parading them as freakish marvels before a gaping public. But, as JeffreyBest Mental health books Lieberman, MD, reveals in his extraordinary and eye-opening book, the path to legitimacy for “the black sheep of medicine” has been anything but smooth. In Shrinks, Dr. Lieberman traces the field from its birth as a mystic pseudo-science through its adolescence as a cult of “shrinks” to its late blooming maturity — beginning after World War II — as a science-driven profession that saves lives. With fascinating case studies and portraits of the luminaries of the field – from Sigmund Freud to Eric Kandel — Shrinks is a gripping and illuminating read, and an urgent call-to- arms to dispel the stigma of mental illnesses by treating them as
    diseases rather than unfortunate states of mind.”
  • Fountain House: Creating Community in Mental Health Practice by Alan Doyle and Julius Lanoil “Since 1948, people suffering from mental health issues, mental health professionals, and committed volunteers have gathered at Fountain House in New York City to find relief from stigmatization and social alienation. Its “working community” approach has earned the organization vast critical recognition, enabling it to replicate its methods across the world. This volume describes the humanity, social inclusivity, personal empowerment, and perpetual innovation of the Fountain House approach. Evidence-based, cost-effective, and transferable, this model achieves crosscultural results by supporting the principles of personal choice, professional and patient collaboration, and the need to be needed, achieving substantive outcomes in employment, schooling, housing, and general wellness.”

 

Also, worth seeing is the best, free ready-reference source for mental health handouts from the National Institute of Mental Health.

I invite you to add your own favorite mental health books in the comments.

In Health,

William Jiang, MLS

 

Kindle books 99 cents!

Kindle Books 99 cents!

Kindle books 99 Cents
Author, William Jiang, MLS

Kindle books 99 cents that you’d actually want to read? Yes! I was one of the Library Chiefs over at Columbia Psychiatry / New York State Psychiatric Institute for almost a decade, and from that career path I decided to write books about mental health and wellness. My Amazon Kindle books have been selling quite well over the years at $9.99 and up. My books have ranked at #1 in the United States, Mexico, Spain, Australia, and Japan. However, because I want to reach as many people as possible with my knowledge of mental health, language acquisition, e-commerce, and literature, I’m practically giving away all my Kindle titles now for only 99 cents. I can not sell them for less! Amazon will not let me! I’m also giving away all of my paperback books and audiobooks  for the lowest prices Amazon is allow me to sell them. My Kindle Books for 99 cents are written in English, Spanish, and French. The titles that are available follow:

English Kindle Books 99 cents

  1. A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of HopeSchizophrenia, Diabetes, and CAM
  2. Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies
  3. A Historical Reader: The New York Times and Madness, 1851-1922
  4. How to Shop Online like A Boss: How to do Online Consumer shopping Right in the United States
  5. The Medical Librarian’s Guide to the Best Medicine in America
  6. Healthy Body, Healthy Mind (Annotated): The Medical Librarian’s Guide
  7. The English Virtual Library
  8. Tackling Spanish the Easy Way
  9. Tackling French The Easy Way
  10. Tackling Portuguese the Easy Way
  11. My Personal Facebook Wall: 2011-2014: Sex, Lies, and My Wild and Crazy Life in New York City: A Coffee Table Book
  12. Facets of the Mind: Assorted Poetry and Prose of William Jiang, MLS

Spanish Kindle Books 99 centsbest books about schizophrenia

  1. Entre la Esquizofrenia y Mi Voluntad: Una Historia de Locura y Esperanza
  2. Inglés Fácilmente
  3. La Guía del Bibliotecario Médico: Sobre las Ciberadicciones
  4. La guía del Bibliotecario Médico: Ansiedad, Depresión, Bipolar, y Esquizofrenia: Nutrición y Terapias Complementarias
  5. La Guía del Bibliotecario Médico: la Mejor Medicina en los Estados Unidos


French
Kindle Books 99 centsshopping online like a boss

  1. Un Homme New Yorkais avec la Schizophrenie: Une Autobiographie

I invite you to visit my Amazon Author Page at http://www.amazon.com/author/williamjiang

 

Oculus Rift, Addiction, and Mental Health

From a public health perspective, this is the last thing kids need to do- spend more time plugged into a virtual world using Facebook’s Oculus Rift. Jimmy go out and play some basketball! No? Ok, then be prepared for the negative consequences. The following is an excerpt from my book Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies, 3rd edition:

Video Games and Depression: A Dangerous Mix

There seems to be a link between excessive teen video game playing or Internet use with anxiety and depression, according the following article. Due to the increasing age of video gamers and with the advent of games like World of Warcraft, the anxiety  caused by excessive video game playing could theoretically hit a gamer of any age. An increase in anxiety  would also follow someone who uses the Internet and computers excessively. Video Game Addiction is a  new category of disorder in the DSM-V, distinct from generalized anxiety disorder, as the condition seems to be rampant and different, especially in Asia. All that being said, compulsive, excessive playing of video games or the Internet should be avoided by anyone with anxiety problems to avoid worsening of anxiety-related problems. As an alternative to videogaming, why not try playing a sport outside or go for a walk in a park?
Source: Suicide & life-threatening behavior. Jun 2011.

Title: Sadness, suicide, and their association with video game and internet overuse amongOculus Rift, Addiction, and Mental Health

Abstract: We investigated the association between excessive video game/Internet use and teen suicidality. Data were obtained from the 2007 and 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a high school-based, nationally representative survey (N = 14,041 and N = 16,410, respectively). Teens who reported 5 hours or more of video games/Internet daily use, in the 2009 YRBS, had a significantly higher risk for sadness (adjusted and weighted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval = 2.1, 1.7-2.5), suicidal ideation (1.7, 1.3-2.1), and suicide planning (1.5, 1.1-1.9). The same pattern was found in the 2007 survey. These findings support an association between excessive video game and Internet use and risk for teen depression and suicidality.
Worse, as of 2010 people were spending an average of 35 hours of time on the Internet. According to the study if one spent 5 hour or more online per day, they had a significantly higher risk of suicide and depression. This Oculus Rift may be responsible for an even higher risk of suicide. If you are a parent and you read this article, do not think Oculus Rift would be a cool gift for your kid. Video Game addiction is a serious thing. Buy your kid some running sneakers, and kick them out of the house into the sunshine and fresh air. Do them a favor.

There is much more to be learned about digital addiction in Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies, 3rd edition

Behavioral Therapists: A Must Read

Most recent review: behavioral therapistsFive Stars, A Must read for Behavioral Therapists.

By Michael Dinittoon March 22, 2015
Format: Paperback
As an MST and family therapist I found this to be a very helpful and informative book. This book was able to bring to light some of the basic causes of the problems that I have previously over looked. Before this book I never thought of how the child who sits on Instagram or Facebook at night was resetting their brain to think it was daylight. This is definitely a must read for anyone who is interested in behavioral focused treatments.
Check out the 3rd, new, updated edition of the “Guide” here:

Better Call Saul and Environmental Illness


Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. Environmental Illness. Electromagnetic Sensitivity. Paranoid Schizophrenia. Depression. Agoraphobia.
All of these words are being thrown about regarding the new show “Better Call Saul”. We can look at this show from a number of sociological perspectives. One, we can see the show as sad that a person who is very obviously suffering and ill is being held up for us to watch writhe and suffer- for our collective entertainment. Two,  we can see that this show is a good thing that MCS, Environmental Illness, Electromagnetic Sensitivity, Paranoid Schizophrenia, Depression, and Agoraphobia are being brought up in the public eye, no matter how perverse the context using Better Call Saul and Environmental Illness. Why? Because at least it is being brought up to the public eye and not being buried under the proverbial rug.

Better Call Saul and Environmental Illness

Some doctors think Environmental Illness is a kind of delusion. If that is the case, then it must
Better Call Saul Schizophrenia be some kind of mass delusion that happens all over the world, see mapping project of people with MCS . Thank God for doctors who hold that EI is a physical illness. The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) are board certified doctors of physical medicine who hold that mental illness can predispose people to MCS, EI, and ES. However, as opposed to the MDs of the American Medical Association, doctors of Environmental Medicine strongly state that these are physical illnesses. Not everyone who has depression or schizophrenia chokes on the perfume of their loved ones. Conversely, not everyone who has Environmental Illness has a mental illness. This is a new subset of people that are injured in a way we don’t yet fully understand.

Better Call Saul and Electromagnetic Illness

The position of the The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) could not be clearer:

“For over 50 years, the American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) has been studying and treating the effects of the environment on human health. In the last 20 years, our physicians began seeing patients who reported that electric power lines, televisions and other electrical devices caused a wide variety of symptoms. By the mid 1990’s, it became clear that patients were adversely affected by electromagnetic fields and becoming more electrically sensitive. In the last five years with the advent of wireless devices, there has been a massive increase in radiofrequency (RF) exposure from wireless devices as well as reports of hypersensitivity and diseases related to electromagnetic field and RF exposure. Multiple studies correlate RF exposure with diseases such as cancer, neurological disease, reproductive disorders, immune dysfunction, and electromagnetic hypersensitivity.”

Environmental Illness and Wikipedia

Some well-meaning but wrong Wikipedia editors seem to be strongly biased against these very real diseases, see: Edited Strongly Biased Wikipedia Page on MCS, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity . I hope this blog post can help educate the public about these very real and difficult to live with Environmental Illnesses and even motivate action on a local, state, national, and even global level. It is so hard to live with this disorder. People who do suffer from these illnesses need to treated with dignity because their lives are already a living nightmare.

Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.

Buddha

Thanks to the character of Charles aka Chuck for bringing up this talking point to the largest television audience in the history of TV.