Best Books about Depression

Best Books about Depression

Best Books about Depression as Curated by former Columbia Psychiatry Library Chief

Best Books about Depression
Former Columbia Psychiatry/ NYSPI Library Chief, William Jiang, MLS

Bienvenidos! My name is William Jiang, MLS and I was the Chief of the Patient Library at Columbia Psychiatry / New York State Psychiatric Institute for almost a decade from 2004-2011. According to the Surgeon General, more than one in four people in the United States struggles with mental health issues: anxiety, bipolar (manic-depression), depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and more. By 2020, the World Health Organization says that depression will be the number one cause of long term disability and death, worldwide.  The following are the best books about depression of the Columbia Psychiatry Patient Library during my tenure and of today.

Best Books about DepressionBest Books About Depression

  • The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression
    by Andrew Solomon “Sometimes, the legacy of depression includes a wisdom beyond one’s years, a depth of passion unexperienced by those who haven’t traveled to hell and back. Off the charts in its enlightening, comprehensive analysis of this pervasive yet misunderstood condition, The Noonday Demon forges a long, brambly path through the subject of depression– exposing all the discordant views and “answers” offered by science, philosophy, law, psychology, literature, art, and history. The result is a sprawling and thoroughly engrossing study, brilliantly synthesized by author Andrew Solomon.”
  • Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies
    by William Jiang, MLS “In this useful guide, Jiang gives a short practical summary of a wide variety of mental disorders ranging from the classical bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia to the more modern affliction of digital addictions. In each category, he supplies a list of non-pharmacologic treatments, providing for each item a reference with abstract. He also offers resources such as national networks and local support groups.” – Marjorie Ordene, MD
  • Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness
    by William Styron “In the summer of 1985, William Styron became numbed by disaffection, apathy, and despair, unable to speak or walk while caught in the grip of advanced depression. His struggle with the disease culminated in a wave of obsession that nearly drove him to suicide, leading him to seek hospitalization before the dark tide engulfed him.”
  • Against Depression
    by Peter D. Kramer “In his landmark bestseller Listening to Prozac, Peter Kramer revolutionized the way we think about antidepressants and the culture in which they are so widely used. Now Kramer offers a frank and unflinching look at the condition those medications treat: depression. Definitively refuting our notions of “heroic melancholy,” he walks readers through groundbreaking new research—studies that confirm depression’s status as a devastating disease and suggest pathways toward resilience. Thought-provoking and enlightening, Against Depression provides a bold revision of our understanding of mood disorder and promises hope to the millions who suffer from it.”
  • Down Came the Rain: My Journey Through Postpartum Depression
     by Brooke Shields  “In this compelling memoir, Brooke Shields talks candidly about her experience with postpartum depression after the birth of her daughter, and provides millions of women with an inspiring example of recovery. When Brooke Shields welcomed her newborn daughter, Rowan Francis, into the world, something unexpected followed–a crippling depression. Now, for the first time ever, in Down Came the Rain, Brooke talks about the trials, tribulations, and finally the triumphs that occurred before, during, and after the birth of her daughter.”
  • Shock
    by Kitty Dukakis “Kitty Dukakis has battled debilitating depression for more than twenty years. Coupled with drug and alcohol addictions that both hid and fueled her suffering, Kitty’s despair was overwhelming. She tried every medication and treatment available; none worked for long. It wasn’t until she tried electroconvulsive therapy, or ECT, that she could reclaim her life. Kitty’s dramatic first-person account of how ECT keeps her illness at bay is half the story of Shock. The other half, by award winning medical reporter Larry Tye, is an engrossing look at the science behind ECT and its dramatic yet subterranean comeback. This book presents a full picture of ECT, analyzing the treatment’s risks along with its benefits. ECT, it turns out, is neither a panacea nor a scourge but a serious option for treating life threatening and disabling mental diseases, like depression, bipolar disorder, and others.”
  • The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness (Book & CD)
    by Mark Williams  “If you’ve ever struggled with depression, take heart. Mindfulness, a simple yet powerful way of paying attention to your most difficult emotions and life experiences, can help you break the cycle of chronic unhappiness once and for all. In The Mindful Way through Depression, four uniquely qualified experts explain why our usual attempts to “think” our way out of a bad mood or just “snap out of it” lead us deeper into the downward spiral. Through insightful lessons drawn from both Eastern meditative traditions and cognitive therapy, they demonstrate how to sidestep the mental habits that lead to despair, including rumination and self-blame, so you can face life’s challenges with greater resilience. This enhanced e-book includes an audio program of guided meditations narrated by Jon Kabat-Zinn.”
  • 100 Questions & Answers About Depression
    by Ava T. Albrecht  “Empower Yourself! Approximately 35 to 40 million Americans will deal with depression at some point in their lives. 100 Questions & Answers About Depression, Second Edition provides practical, authoritative answers to key questions about depression. Written in an easy-to-understand style by two prominent psychiatrists, Drs. Ava T. Albrecht and Charles Herrick, this unique guide presents comprehensive information on causes of depression, treatment options, and coping techniques. This completely revised book includes essential new topics on risk factors associated with depression, brain therapies, physiological drug dependence, and more! The only book to feature both patient and doctor views, this invaluable resource has the tools you need to understand and deal with this debilitating condition.”
  • Lincoln’s Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness
    by Joshua Wolf Shenk “Drawing on seven years of his own research and the work of other esteemed Lincoln scholars, Shenk reveals how the sixteenth president harnessed his depression to fuel his astonishing success. Lincoln found the solace and tactics he needed to deal with the nation’s worst crisis in the “coping strategies” he had developed over a lifetime of persevering through depressive episodes and personal tragedies. With empathy and authority gained from his own experience with depression, Shenk crafts a nuanced, revelatory account of Lincoln and his legacy. Based on careful, intrepid research, Lincoln’s Melancholy unveils a wholly new perspective on how our greatest president brought America through its greatest turmoil. Shenk relates Lincoln’s symptoms, including mood swings and at least two major breakdowns, and offers compelling evidence of the evolution of his disease, from “major depression” in his twenties and thirties to “chronic depression” later on. Shenk reveals the treatments Lincoln endured and his efforts to come to terms with his melancholy, including a poem he published on suicide and his unpublished writings on the value of personal—and national—suffering. By consciously shifting his goal away from personal contentment (which he realized he could not attain) and toward universal justice, Lincoln gained the strength and insight that he, and America, required to transcend profound darkness.”
  • Mind Over Mood, Second Edition: Change How You Feel by Changing the Way You Think
    by Dennis Greenberger and Christine Padesky “Developed by two master clinicians with extensive experience in cognitive therapy treatment and training, this popular workbook shows readers how to improve their lives using cognitive therapy. The book is designed to be used alone or in conjunction with professional treatment. Step-by-step worksheets teach specific skills that have helped hundreds of thousands people conquer depression, panic attacks, anxiety, anger, guilt, shame, low self-esteem, eating disorders, substance abuse and relationship problems. Readers learn to use mood questionnaires to identify, rate, and track changes in feelings; change the thoughts that contribute to problems; follow step-by-step strategies to improve moods; and take action to improve daily living and relationships. The book’s large-size format facilitates reading and writing ease.”
  • His Bright Light: The Story of Nick Traina
    by Danielle Steel “I want to share the story, and the pain, the courage, the love, and what I learned in living through it. I want Nick’s life to be not only a tender memory for us, but a gift to others. . . . I would like to offer people hope and the realities we lived with. I want to make a difference. My hope is that someone will be able to use what we learned, and save a life with it.”—Danielle Steel From the day he was born, Nick Traina was his mother’s joy. By nineteen, he was dead. This is Danielle Steel’s powerful, personal story of the son she lost and the lessons she learned during his courageous battle against darkness. Sharing tender, painful memories and Nick’s remarkable journals, Steel brings us a haunting duet between a singular young man and the mother who loved him—and a harrowing portrait of a masked killer called manic depression, which afflicts between two and three million Americans. At once a loving legacy and an unsparing depiction of a devastating illness, Danielle Steel’s tribute to her lost son is a gift of life, hope, healing, and understanding to us all.”
  • Churchill and the ‘Black Dog’ of Depression: Reassessing the Biographical Evidence of Psychological Disorder
    by Wilfred Attenborough “Winston Churchill is widely believed to have been at risk from a congenital tendency towards prolonged, despairing, even suicidal, depression, from which he is said to have sought escape in ceaseless career-related endeavour. In this, the first book-length sifting of all the available biographical evidence, including extracts from archival letters and papers and never before been published materials, the truth emerges as significantly less grave than legend has it, but somewhat more complex. An essay Churchill published first in 1925 as a magazine article with the deceptively mundane title ‘Hobbies’ emerges as the key to understanding the cultural icon’s actual psychological difficulties, and his management of them. Attenborough’s pioneering book provides a clearer and deeper understanding of Churchill the man, and it substantially modifies the established interpretation of the influence of his inner world on Churchill the politician and statesman.”

 

I invite you to add your own favorite books about depression in the comments.

In Health,

William Jiang, MLS

 

Kindle books 99 cents!

Kindle Books 99 cents!

Kindle books 99 Cents
Author, William Jiang, MLS

Kindle books 99 cents that you’d actually want to read? Yes! I was one of the Library Chiefs over at Columbia Psychiatry / New York State Psychiatric Institute for almost a decade, and from that career path I decided to write books about mental health and wellness. My Amazon Kindle books have been selling quite well over the years at $9.99 and up. My books have ranked at #1 in the United States, Mexico, Spain, Australia, and Japan. However, because I want to reach as many people as possible with my knowledge of mental health, language acquisition, e-commerce, and literature, I’m practically giving away all my Kindle titles now for only 99 cents. I can not sell them for less! Amazon will not let me! I’m also giving away all of my paperback books and audiobooks  for the lowest prices Amazon is allow me to sell them. My Kindle Books for 99 cents are written in English, Spanish, and French. The titles that are available follow:

English Kindle Books 99 cents

  1. A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of HopeSchizophrenia, Diabetes, and CAM
  2. Guide to Natural Mental Health: Anxiety, Bipolar, Depression, Schizophrenia, and Digital Addiction: Nutrition, and Complementary Therapies
  3. A Historical Reader: The New York Times and Madness, 1851-1922
  4. How to Shop Online like A Boss: How to do Online Consumer shopping Right in the United States
  5. The Medical Librarian’s Guide to the Best Medicine in America
  6. Healthy Body, Healthy Mind (Annotated): The Medical Librarian’s Guide
  7. The English Virtual Library
  8. Tackling Spanish the Easy Way
  9. Tackling French The Easy Way
  10. Tackling Portuguese the Easy Way
  11. My Personal Facebook Wall: 2011-2014: Sex, Lies, and My Wild and Crazy Life in New York City: A Coffee Table Book
  12. Facets of the Mind: Assorted Poetry and Prose of William Jiang, MLS

Spanish Kindle Books 99 centsbest books about schizophrenia

  1. Entre la Esquizofrenia y Mi Voluntad: Una Historia de Locura y Esperanza
  2. Inglés Fácilmente
  3. La Guía del Bibliotecario Médico: Sobre las Ciberadicciones
  4. La guía del Bibliotecario Médico: Ansiedad, Depresión, Bipolar, y Esquizofrenia: Nutrición y Terapias Complementarias
  5. La Guía del Bibliotecario Médico: la Mejor Medicina en los Estados Unidos


French
Kindle Books 99 centsshopping online like a boss

  1. Un Homme New Yorkais avec la Schizophrenie: Une Autobiographie

I invite you to visit my Amazon Author Page at http://www.amazon.com/author/williamjiang

 

Jennifer Connelly Visits NYSPI Library for Role in Virginia (2012)

 

Academy Award Winner Jennifer Connelly Visits Patient Library for Role in Virginia

From the Fall 2009 NYSPI Patient Library Newsletter:

I was asked the day before Academy Award winning actress Jennifer Connelly visited PI if I would meet with her. The opportunity to meet the actress who portrayed John Nash’s wife in the award-winning movie A Beautiful Mind amazed me. Of course, I said yes. The evening before her visit, it was difficult for me to sleep because I was excited.

Jennifer Connelly When Ms. Connelly arrived shortly after 10:30 am, I was ready to be as helpful to her as I could. She was to meet the director of NYSPI, Dr. Lieberman, after she left me, so I wanted our time together to be productive. It turned out she was studying for the lead role in the forthcoming movie, What’s Wrong with Virginia, where she will be playing an emotionally disturbed woman. Because of my personal battle with schizophrenia, she wanted to meet me. I answered some initial questions she had, then showed her some videos which featured me: AstraZeneca’s More Success Stories and our Spanishlanguage psychoeducational film, ¿Qué es la Esquizofrenia?. I was going to offer her a copy of my autobiography, A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of Hope ,but she had already started reading an electronic copy. Then I answered a slew of other questions she had, and mentioned our community event for the film Canvas, which was of interest to her. Finally, I showed her other print and video resources she could use to learn about schizophrenia, and gave her a NARSAD pamphlet on the subject. She told me a bit about the film, and I was happy to learn about the complexity and humanity of her role. At the end of our hour together, she thanked me for my time, and I told her it was a pleasure to meet her.

In retrospect, I was struck by her down-to-earth manner, intelligence, and genuine interest in learning more about schizophrenia as one facet of the human condition. I look forward to seeing her on the silver screen.

***

About Mr. Jiang: Schizophrenic. Psychotic. Insane. Too many people associate these words with murderer, useless, hopeless, and bum. Meet Will. At 19 he had his first psychotic break with reality. Afterwards, he had to re-learn his place in the world. He went from being a vibrant and gifted university senior, to being a mental patient on a locked ward for whom life was laborious and chaotic. In the beginning, he had to learn to cope with reality again minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day, then year by year. Much later, after years of being a medical librarian, he was able to unlock some of his own brain’s healing potential using natural nutritional techniques. Now, at 41, his list of life accomplishments is impressive. Author of 13 popular Kindle books. Former Columbia University/NYSPI Medical Library Chief. Designer. Speaker of English, Spanish, French, and Portuguese.

His critically-acclaimed autobiography is “A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of Hope“. Mr Jiang and his intense 20+ year struggle with schizophrenia is iconoclastic because he challenges us to think differently about stereotypes of mental illness. Most movies and media news paint one-dimensional, thinly drawn caricatures of mentally ill people, instilling fear. Refreshingly, words that could describe Mr. Jiang’s life and work include: brilliant, passionate, artistic, profound, knowledgeable, inspirational, and even “wise teacher”.

William Jiang BA MLS Mental Health Author and Advocate
Facebook Group: Living Well With Schizophrenia
Author Blog: http://www.mentalhealthbooks.net
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/williamjiang

Bibliotherapy and Psychoeducation at NYSPI 2004-2011, Being The Patient Librarian at New York State Psychiatric Institution/ Columbia Psychiatry

Bibliotherapy and Psychoeducation HistoryHappily, I step out of the quick-moving steel elevator in my gym clothes after working out for an hour in the basement of the modern architectural beauty that is the hospital in which I work. I always like passing the entrance at 1051 Riverside Drive. Known as the Atrium, this artistic masterwork looks like a web woven with intricate white girders that support the giant glass facade. I reach my floor and I take two quick rights. The hallway lights flicker a bright institutional white. It is early in the morning as I take out my keys to open the three sturdy steel doors behind which is my library. It is a rare kind of library in, arguably, America’s oldest and most competitive psychiatric research institution. I have reached The Patient and Family Library of New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI), and I am its Chief Librarian. I open the last white steel door to my library and it closes behind me. I am excited because the online book catalog that I programmed from scratch is live and is searchable from anywhere in the world. This includes the three adult inpatient units in our hospital, and those are the most important people I want to reach. Those are the people I want to reach with our collection of psychoeducational bibliotherapeutic books, magazines, DVDs, and ready-reference materials in English and Spanish. In other words, my library offered educational materials about various mental disorders to help the sufferers cope better and develop insight to their challenges brought about by their illnesses.

This was a typical day for me at NYSPI. I was the Chief for seven years between July 2004 and July 2011. In that time I learned a lot about the major mental illnesses that NYSPI treats: eating disorders, anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. These mental illnesses are significant and touch everybody in our society. Even if you don’t have a mental illness yourself, there is definitely somebody that you know or have passed by during your day who is personally affected.  According to the Surgeon General, one in four Americans suffer from one or more of the disorders I listed above. Mental illness does not discriminate, and it can strike anybody: the homeless man in the street or the wealthy “do-ers” of American society.

There was a delegation from Korea that came to study my library as a model for Korean psychoeducational libraries. There were also four other patient libraries in the United States that came to me to help them build successful patient libraries based on the concept of psychoeducation. My library helped over 1,000 per year. In terms of the physical collection, my library had the following resources: over 500 books that were specially selected by staff and myself geared towards laypeople but that gave education and insight to our patients. We had books that dealt with topics from theoretical to concrete psychology. One could find a book about Freud and Jung or 100 Questions & Answers About Schizophrenia or The Mindful Way Through Depression. Also the library had periodical subscriptions to 12 psychoeducational magazine and newsletter titles. We had everything from Scientific American: Mind to ADDitude. Also, the library had over 100 psychoeducational video titles from MTV’s True Life: I Have Schizophrenia to NOVA’s documentary about eating disorders: Dying to Be Thin. I also got the best available psychoeducational ready reference materials from the National Institute of Mental Health. These took the form of pamphlets that were attractive and easily given to people who needed a quick comprehensive introduction to a particular disorder. It could have as easily have been someone who wanted to learn about bipolar disorder in Spanish or maybe they wanted a mental health crisis and resource referral line in New York City in Chinese such as LIFENET.

I remember that my Patient Library had a movie event and panel discussion about brain stimulation techniques organized around the amazingly insightful movie “Shock” that featured the struggle with the dark depression of the wife of the presidential candidate Michael Dukakis: Kitty Dukakis. She came forward to fight the stigma associated with mental illness by letting the world know in this movie that she needed needed electroshock therapy otherwise known as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to deal with her severe depression. The movie had people who were pro and con ECT, so it felt balanced. It is sobering to think that sometimes, the only thing standing between certain death and you is that man in a white coat with his hand on the healing power of electric current: the psychiatrist. that being said, I personally would undergo ECT based on what I know about its efficacy and possible adverse effects.

The result of much of the learning that I attained as Chief Librarian is published in two works of nonfiction. I shared some of my objective knowledge about psychiatry in The Medical Librarian’s Guide to Anxiety, Depression, Bipolar, and Schizophrenia: Nutrition,and Complimentary Therapies, Createspace, 2012. The book covers a lot of ground, and is potentially useful for many. For example, omega-3 fish oils have the power to prevent fully- blown psychosis in those that are prone to it due to genetics and/or environmental factors. Amazing stuff! My second work of nonfiction is my autobiographical sketch: A Schizophrenic Will: A Story Of Madness, A Story Of Hope which I wrote to do my part to combat the stigma surrounding mental illnesses and to give people living with my same diagnosis hope. It also qualifies as a psychoeducational text.

I have mentioned psychoeducation, but what is it really?

Psychoeducation

Psychoeducation refers to the education offered to people who live with a psychological disturbance. Frequently psychoeducational training involves patients with schizophrenia, clinical depression, anxiety disorders, psychotic illnesses, eating disorders, and personality disorders, as well as patient training courses in the context of the treatment of physical illnesses. Family members are also included. A goal is for the patient to understand and be better able to deal with the presented illness. Also, the patient’s own strengths, resources and coping skills are reinforced, in order to avoid relapse and contribute to their own health and wellness on a long-term basis. The theory is, with better knowledge the patient has of their illness, the better the patient can live with their condition.

The concept of psychoeducation was first noted in the medical literature, in an article by John E. Donley “Psychotherapy and re-education” in The Journal of Abnormal Psychology, published in 1911. It wasn’t until 30 years later that the first use of the word psychoeducation appeared in the medical literature in title of the book The Psychoeducational Clinic by Brian E. Tomlinson. New York, NY, US: MacMillan Co. This book was published in 1941. In French, the first instance of the term psychoéducation is in the thesis “La stabilité du comportement” published in 1962.

The popularization and development of the term psychoeducation into its current form is widely attributed to the American researcher C.M. Anderson in 1980 in the context of the treatment of schizophrenia. Her research concentrated on educating relatives concerning the symptoms and the process of the schizophrenia. Also, her research focused on the stabilization of social authority and on the improvement in handling of the family members among themselves. Finally, C.M. Anderson’s research included more effective stress management techniques. Psychoeducation in behavior therapy has its origin in the patient’s relearning of emotional and social skills. In the last few years increasingly systematic group programs have been developed, in order to make the knowledge more understandable to patients and their families.

Also, my library offered bibliotherapy. What exactly is that?

Bibliotherapy

My library offered a form of bibliotherapy which has its roots in the early 19th century and before: this form of therapy is an ancient concept when we talk about libraries. The ancient Greeks put great faith in the power of literature, and a sign above an ancient Greek library read: “healing place for the soul”.

In America of 1802, although the term “bibliotherapy” had not been coined, Doctor Benjamin Rush recommended the establishment of a library in every hospital to amuse and instruct the patients. Rush recommended that books be used for treatment and exhorted the medical community to hire trained professionals to work with asylum patients. However, because novels, in the early 19th century, were thought to add to the development of mental illnesses such as dementia praecox, or schizophrenia, he suggested the use of nonfiction books for the insane.

In the US the first patient library opened at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1844. This library started by providing moral and religious reading materials to patients as they exited the hospital, back into the community. Of note, interlibrary loan from nearby public libraries existed to provide books and other materials such as business, technical, Braille, and other materials in foreign languages .

From 1906-1914 hospital-centered patient libraries were mostly seen in private hospitals, state run mental hospitals, and long-term care facilities. World War I created a huge push for more books. Books provided solace to many soldiers while they were recuperating in the US and France. The war built momentum speaking to the therapeutic power of books.

More on my tenure at NYSPI

I led psychoeducational groups on all three of the adult inpatient units in English and Spanish, and in some groups I presented my patient library newsletter that was sent around the community to over 1000 Columbia University people. Many of the patients found the groups helpful. Many issues of the newsletter dealt with things that can help people who suffer from mental illness cope with their illnesses such as meditation, breathwork, avoiding cannabis to avoid increasing the risk of psychosis, and the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids for multiple psychiatric issues. In one issue that I remember well, I included a book review of my own critically acclaimed autobiography which is available on the Kindle as well as Amazon.com in book form: A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of Hope. When I led groups anywhere in the hospital, on the English-speaking wards or Spanish-speaking units., it didn’t matter what the diagnoses of people on the units were, I had a lot of positive feedback from both patients and staff. People told me that my autobiography and my living example gave them hope to continue living. Those moments were some of my most gratifying times at NYSPI.

Now, due to budget cuts and my leaving the position of Patient Librarian, the library has closed. There is a huge demand for real estate in NYSPI because they try to maximize the amount of research that they’re able to do, and the Institute only has so many square feet of office and lab space on campus. I will always be grateful for the administration and staff of New York State psychiatric institution for permitting me the honor of making a difference in our patient’s lives during my tenure.

***

About Mr. Jiang: Schizophrenic. Psychotic. Insane. Too many people associate these words with murderer, useless, hopeless, and bum. Meet Will. At 19 he had his first psychotic break with reality. Afterwards, he had to re-learn his place in the world. He went from being a vibrant and gifted university senior, to being a mental patient on a locked ward for whom life was laborious and chaotic. In the beginning, he had to learn to cope with reality again minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day, then year by year. Much later, after years of being a medical librarian, he was able to unlock some of his own brain’s healing potential using natural nutritional techniques. Now, at 41, his list of life accomplishments is impressive. Author of 13 popular Kindle books. Former Columbia University/NYSPI Medical Library Chief. Designer. Speaker of English, Spanish, French, and Portuguese.

His critically-acclaimed autobiography is “A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of Hope“. Mr Jiang and his intense 20+ year struggle with schizophrenia is iconoclastic because he challenges us to think differently about stereotypes of mental illness. Most movies and media news paint one-dimensional, thinly drawn caricatures of mentally ill people, instilling fear. Refreshingly, words that could describe Mr. Jiang’s life and work include: brilliant, passionate, artistic, profound, knowledgeable, inspirational, and even “wise teacher”.

William Jiang BA MLS Mental Health Author and Advocate
Facebook Group: Living Well With Schizophrenia
Author Blog: http://www.mentalhealthbooks.net
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/williamjiang