Anger? It Might Be Abilify | NLP Discoveries

Anger? It Might Be Abilify

This is a guest post by William Jiang, MLS

Note:This is an opinion-based post. All views expressed are the personal perspective of the author. No medical advice should be implied.

Abilify. It is the single best-selling drug of all time. From April 2013, through March 2014, sales of Abilify (official name, aripiprazole) totaled $6,885,243,368.Angry? It Might Be Abilify

That is, Abilify made almost 7 billion in one year.

At the end of 2014, Abilify had been on sale for almost 14 years. Abilify at high doses is used for things like psychosis and at low doses for making anti-depressants work better.

It is a quite impressive drug on many levels. One of its major actions is a “goldilocks” action where it regulates dopamine so that levels are neither too high nor too low in the brain.

16 Years on Abilify

I took it  from 2001 until July 2017. However, after helping me for most of that time, it turned my life into a living nightmare: I became homicidal once again due to extreme rage. I’m lucky I survived and nobody got hurt. Let me share my little story with you. Maybe it can help somebody you know. Maybe it can help you.

Seventeen years ago, I was homicidal and suicidal due to Seroquel, as I talked about in my best-selling autobiography A Schizophrenic Will: A Story of Madness, A Story of Hope.

A friend advised me that it was a dangerous drug, so I kept that in mind when all of a sudden my personality changed to a homicidal and suicidal man from being a pretty well balanced guy. The change was quite marked and sudden, so I took myself off of 600mg of Seroquel and put myself on a drug that saved my life at the moment: 15 mg of Zyprexa.

I never thought a close call like that would happen again. It did.

The second time was with Abilify- for three years. I struggled with rage a few times on Abilify: mostly homicidal rage. I thought Abilify was letting the rage get through, but it turns out that it was causing the extreme anger.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE on PsychCentral.com